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Philip's 1980 TRS-80 Color Computer
The Radio Shack TRS-80 Color Computer (also called Tandy Color Computer, or CoCo) was launched in 1980. I purchased the first TRS-80 Coco that was put on display at my local Radio Shack store in 1980.  Despite the name, the "Color Computer" was a radical departure from earlier TRS-80 Models.  In particular it had a Motorola 6809E processor, rather than the traditional TRS-80's Zilog Z80 processor.  The Color Computer ran a BASIC dialect written by Microsoft and had 4K of memory.
 
My Dad and I owned several of the original TRS-80 Color Computer systems and we eventually replaced them with the TRS-80 Color Computer  Model 2's which are pictured further below.   
 
We took them all out of our old garage for a special photo-op session back in 2006 after my Dad passed away.  Take a look at these old systems and see if any of them bring back some fond memories for you too.
 
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John Conrod's Original 1983 Radio Shack TRS-80 Model 4P
Our  1983 Radio Shack TRS-80 Model 4P Portable Computer.  The Model 4 shipped with TRSDOS 6, an enhanced version of LDOS by Logical Systems.   When the Model 4 booted into TRSDOS 6 the video display switched into 80x24 mode and the entire 64KB address space was mapped as RAM. The Model 4 was also capable of running all Model 3 software when a Model 3 operating system disk was detected and loaded during bootup with a 64x16 video mode and Model 3 ROMs mapped from address zero.
 

The Model 4 also had the ability to display 640x240 or 512x192 high-resolution monochrome graphics with an optional board. A "luggable" version known as the Model 4P (1983) was a self-contained unit with a case design similar to that of a portable sewing machine.

 
 
 
    
 
One of our many TRS-80 Model 2 Color Computers
 
This TRS-80 Color Computer 2 was the last one we bought in 1984 and it still runs today.  My daughter asked me the other day, "Where is the monitor for that old computer?"  She was surprised when I  hooked up the old TRS-80 Color Computer 2 to aTV screen using an old RF box and it still worked! 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
  
Our First "Portable" 1984 TRS-80 Color Computer 2
 
My brother Michael took this TRS-80 Color Computer 2's  apart and put into a leather briefcase for easy travel.   He didn't realize that he had built the first portable Color Computer "Laptop" Briefcase Computer.  Notice the green TV screen on the right which says, "Color Computer Extended Basic 1.1".  The old TRS-80 Color Computer 2 still boots up after 25 years in our garage!  
 
 
 
 
 
Philip's Home-Built 1986 PC-DOS XT Clone
 
This was my original 1986 self-built  Intel 8088 PC Clone.  I later upgraded it with a 20MB Harddrive. Yes, that's a whopping 20MB Harddrive!  Unfortunately, the harddrive does not spin up anymore.  
 
 
  
 
 
 
 
 
Here is a close up picture of the original 8088 chip inside the case surrounded by a lot of dust.    I wiped the dust off the old Intel chip so you can see the original date stamp on it.  Yes, that date stamp says 1981!   Now does that make you feel old or what?!  
 
Since the IBM PC Compatible clones took over the majority of the software marketplace we focused all of KIDware and BibleBytes  development efforts on this platform.